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Play Publishing & Theatrical Rights Licensing of Plays and Musicals for All Audiences

The Archer Who Went I Know Not Where To Fetch I Know Not What — TYA musical

Posted on May 9, 2017 in Child/Youth Audiences, Family Audiences, Latest, Musicals, New Releases

Book & lyrics by Deen Ferrell Music by Larry Pearson (Suitable for all theatres, companies who perform for children and young people.) Based on a Russian folk tale, the story concerns Andrei, the Royal Archer, who, when he chases down one of his arrows, finds it imbeded in a magical white dove. Andrei removes the arrow. The dove turns into a beautiful girl (a princess) and becomes his wife. Enter the King and his Counselor. Jealous, smitten by the young Princess Tia, they devise three quests that are sure to rid themselves of Andrei. But through the magic held by Tia, and her former servant, now invisible, the seemingly impossible quests are completed, and in the end there is a new King and Queen on the throne. Seven delightful contemporary songs help to drive the story to its end....

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The Plays of Thomas F. Rogers Volume 1: Perestroika and Glasnost

Posted on Oct 10, 2016 in Books About Theatre, New Releases, Plays

Thomas F. Rogers is a prominent Playwright and former Professor of the Russian language, now retired. Having lived in the U.S. and in Russia, his plays have made the mystery and controversy of “The Red East” singularly accessible  His plays, “Charades,” “Crime and Punishment,” “God’s Fools,” “The Idiot,” and “The Second Priest,” gathered in one volume for the first time, deal with Russia, Russians, and  The U.S.S.R, their relations with other countries as well as internally, and focus on the transition into and out of Communism. Taut, political and ideological dramas, all, they enlighten the Human condition, in thoughtful and lively stage adaptations. Now arranged in this one volume, they are available for study and perusal by Professors, Scholars, and Students, Producers, Directors and Actors, who will grow to appreciate the keen mind, probing satire, and wit of Thomas...

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Crime & Punishment — A New Play

Posted on Jul 12, 2014 in Classics, Plays

Adapted and Translated by Thomas F. Rogers (Can be produced by Professional, College/University, Community and High School groups.) CRIME AND PUNISHMENT focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. He argues that with the pawnbroker’s money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime while ridding the world of a worthless vermin. He also commits the murder to test his own hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things and even have the right to so behave. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon Bonaparte, believing that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose. Although not a playwright, Dostoevsky has been cited as having...

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The Wager — A Play

Posted on Apr 16, 2014 in Premiere Plays

by Thomas F. Rogers based on the novel by Phillip Flammer (For production by Professionals, College/Universities, Community Groups) The Wager is a tense dramatic adaptation of a novel-length manuscript by Air Force pilot and Professor of History, Philip Flammer. The play is set in 1945, at the end of World War II. Eight Nazi soldiers, two of them severely wounded, find themselves caught in a shack in a wood surrounded by Soviet troops. Their urgent goal is, somehow, to escape the Russian soldiers and make their way through the forest back to their own lines, but as the most experienced soldier among them, Sergeant Reinberger, explains after returning from a solo reconnaissance mission, the Russians are so thick in the woods that, particularly with wounded men, escape is impossible and death inevitable. The dramatic question is then, how might...

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The Seagull — An Adaptation

Posted on Oct 3, 2013 in Classics, Plays

Adapted and Translated by Thomas F. Rogers from the Chekhov original. (For production by Professional Groups, College/University Groups, Community Groups, High Schools) The first of Anton Chekhov’s four major plays,* THE SEAGULL depicts the conflicting aspirations of writers and artists, old and young—the budding playwright Konstantin; his actress mother Irina; her philandering lover, the famous author Trigorin; and Konstantin’s soulmate Nina, who yearns to be an actress like his mother but is callously dallied with by Trigorin.  A seagull he happens to shoot symbolizes both Nina’s failure and Konstantin’s actual fate when, in despair, he takes his own life. THE SEAGULL is a slice-of-life drama set in the Russian countryside at the end of the 19th century. Its cast of characters are dissatisfied with their lives. Some desire love. Some desire success. Some hope to realize artistic genius. Some critics...

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Gentle Barbarian — A Play

Posted on Aug 5, 2013 in Premiere Plays

 by Thomas F. Rogers (For production by Professional Groups, College/University Groups, Community Groups) Based on the life of Russian author, Ivan Turgenev, this taut play is very Chekhovian in nature. Its characters are richly drawn and full of repressed sensuality. Their lives and loves interweave, creating a tapestry of Russia during the middle 1800’s — the Russia of the Tsar — the Russia of both the privileged few and the peasant working class. (sounds like America of the early 2000s) It is fascinating to notice that–despite the social upheaval that led to its eventual dissolution and once more the former USSR — much remains as before.  In its poignant irony, Turgenev’s own personal story surpasses those he penned which, in Western Europe, won for him such acclaim. In the person of this humanitarian idealist, the play illustrates the hypocrisy...

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Charades — A Play

Posted on Aug 2, 2013 in Plays

by Thomas F. Rogers.  (For production by Professional Groups, College/University Groups, Community Groups) A one-time stock broker, the middle-aged Danny, boasts about his mercenary adventures in Rhodesia, Nicaragua and more recently Afghanistan. He also claims to have an adopted son there, a defector from the Red Army. In Danny’s absence a younger man shows up, claiming to be a Soviet Defector and Danny’s actual son. We later learn that he is bent on killing Danny for ostensibly betraying his mother to the KGB. Meanwhile, Danny’s one certain offspring, the pregnant Gladys, accuses her father of sending her husband to Afghanistan. To absolve himself, Danny must admit his military exploits are an illusion. In doing so, however, he will betray the possibility that Gladys never had a husband. He leaves the choice to her. The other characters’ histories equally come...

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