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Theatrical Publisher and Performance Rights Licensing of Plays and Musicals for All Audiences and Theatre Groups, Amateur, Educational, Professional and Religious

The Ruckus At Machias — a play

Posted on Dec 27, 2017 in Award Winners, Family Audience Plays and Musicals, Latest, New Releases, Plays, Seniors in Cast

The true story of the American Revolution’s first sea battle. by Richard Sewell (Perfect for Professional, Community, College/University and High School production.) Hannah won herself a red dress, and the town a warship! Starvation threatens the people of Machias, Massachusetts Colony, (now Maine) in June of 1775, when a British warship accompanies a local merchant returning from Boston with supplies. Machias was a lonely lumber camp in dire need of food, powder and shot. Instead of providing the lumber demanded by the British to build barracks for British soldiers near Boston, the desperate citizens erected a Liberty Pole to commemorate the fighting at Lexington and Concord. As the British navy was the undisputed master of the world’s oceans, the enraged Captain then ordered the warship to fire on the community, causing the townsfolk to muster their meager resources — axes,...

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The Immortal — A Play

Posted on Sep 30, 2014 in Plays

by Thomas F. Rogers  (For performance by Professional, College/University, Amateur and Community groups.) This play imaginatively derives from real incidents that occurred when the Shah of Iran was deposed in 1941 by the theocratically dominated factions that now govern that country’s people. But he did not leave the country until 1953.  What the play imaginatively treats are the Shah’s actual thoughts and his possible reaction while dying and in exile.  Parables from the Middle East and India are extensively employed in the script as commentary on his circumstances and, more broadly, on the world’s realpolitik, which never seems to change. The issues of this hard-hitting play are just as timely and at home on the stage today as they were in the 1950s. Totalitarian regimes rise and fall and rise again. NOTE: The artwork at the left is a...

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